Saturday, 5 June 2010

Rugby Union temporary deviation


Hi this is Jim Nariel from learningrugbyunion.blogspot.com

For the very first time I am stepping out of The many aspects of Rugby Unionto post information on a completley different subject. This reason is that I have found something that is so useful and FREE and I need to share this

This about a little report written by Dean Holland which I am giving away absolutley FREE. This report is about driving traffic to a website or blog or whatever you wish to.

I have used the major tip at the end of this report and driven lots traffic and therefore amazed by this simple but effective tip

So sorry if you are only interested in Rugby Union and Rugby Union is what you expect to see and read about. However this was so powerful I felt I had to share it with whoever this may help. Of course as I have stated before this is absolutley free - so please accept this free gift with my blessing.

To get access to this please click on the banner on the right hand side of this blog showing Traffic Tactics Revealed Free. Download and enjoy.

All the best, enjoy and use the report and we will return to Rugby Union next post

Wednesday, 28 April 2010

Rugby Workouts - Jonny Wilkinson

What to know about Rugby Equipment


If you are an aspiring rugby star then you obviously need to make sure that the rugby equipment that you have or are going to purchase is top notch. Now this does not mean that you have to go out and spend hundreds or even thousands on top of the range stuff. You just need to make sure that you are going to buy items that are of a good level of quality.

Choosing something that is middle of the range is always a good idea if you are just starting out in rugby. In fact this philosophy is actually true of any sport and you would do well to think about this if you are going to try any new game.

When it comes to rugby equipment, there are a couple of basics that every player must have. Most obvious is perhaps the foot wear that you will need. If you are unfamiliar with rugby boots you may initially think that they resemble a football boot, but in truth there are important differences.

The studs on a rugby boot are arranged in a different pattern because they perform a different function. They are there to help the player dig into the ground when they are in a tackle situation or perhaps more especially when they are defending in a ruck. Of course, it goes without saying that these studs come in especially useful when you are trying to keep maximum traction and ensure that your scrum wins valuable ground.

Most people are aware that rugby is a very hard hitting game and is definitely not for the faint hearted. As such, you need to make sure that you protect yourself as much as possible. There are three key items that you should take into consideration. The first is a gum guard. This part of rugby equipment is actually compulsory in many matches. It protects your teeth and this is very important because you would not want any harm to come to them!

Secondly you should consider getting some protective clothing, especially if you are going to play in the forward line. It is actually also important for back line players, more so if they are smaller and need protection from those knocks. You should also consider getting a scrum cap. This is going to be your protection against a possible concussion which is a common injury in rugby unless appropriate precautions are taken.

While some players might feel as if all of this is a bit much, most would rather be safe than sorry, and are happy to take advantage of the advances in technology that have drastically improved rugby safety. The right rugby equipment will mean that you are going to be able to play rugby for longer as you avoid some serious injuries.

So make sure that you take safety into consideration when you choose your rugby equipment. You will find that there is a large variety of options out there, so take your time to make sure that you get the most suitable kit for you.

Established in 1973, Morrant Group Ltd is a family run business with over 35 years experience in mail order team sports equipment. Father, Daughter, Son and staff are working hard every day to ensure that our company achieves its aim. We sell a range of sports gear, including rugby equipment and goods. Please visit our website at http://www.morrant.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shantelle_Hynes

Tuesday, 30 March 2010

The top 4 Knee Brace Types and best pain relief in Rugby Union

How To Find The Best Knee Brace For Rugby Union


How To Find The Best Rugby Knee Brace

There are so many different braces that you can find at stores and on the internet that you might get frustrated at all of your options. - We can understand this. - That is why we are going to make the process of how to find your new rugby knee brace easier. Here's how...

Answer the following questions for yourself, and then record your answers. The information you get from these questions will help you have a much better idea of what you will need to get when you go a knee brace website :

Knee Pain

Do you currently have knee pain? If so, rate it on a scale 1-10. Yes, it is possible for the pain to go up and down sometimes, depending on what you are doing, but it is probably best to take the most severe knee pain answer you have. You will see why at the end of this article...

Knee Instability

Do you currently suffer from any kind of knee instability? Again, think about when you are on and off the field. Does your knee instability fall into a mild, moderate, or severe category? The way you can determine this is by subjectively rating your instability on a scale 1-10. Many times you may feel more unstable as you are running during rugby than you do at your home while you are resting, for example. Again, at the conclusion of this article you will see why this answer really matters...

Your Budget

When it comes down to it, none of us wants to waste our hard earned money on anything! Why should you have to do that?! Think about your budget for a second. If you know that you can only spend $100 on a knee brace, for example, then the answer to this question will also help you to formulate your answer. A word to the wise. Typically, non-custom knee supports are much less costly than a custom knee support, and you will find that they essentially provide the same support. This information alone can save you over $1500.00.

Your Diagnosis

Has your doctor given you any definitive diagnosis on your knee? Such as an ACL, MCL or meniscus tear? If you know this information it will be very helpful when looking for a knee support for rugby.

Putting All This Information Together

When you compile all of your answers from each section, you will basically be able to breeze through a knee brace website. Braces are advertised based on knee instability, pain levels, diagnosis, and your budget.

The Knee Brace Shop

If you would like to take your knee stability to the next level (affordably) then visit us online today at http://www.drbraceco.com Dr. Brace Co. is an education based site, created by true brace specialists, that can provide helpful information and meaningful support for your knee. If you have questions come to our site and let us know, or call toll free 1-888-564-4888. We will respond.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Daniel_P._Sims

Sunday, 28 March 2010

Bill Mclaren the man with the golden voice of Rugby Union

Bill Mclaren The voice of Rugby Union


Bill McLaren was the voice of rugby union for fifty years. In those fifty years, he commentated on some of the best players the world of rugby has ever seen: Gareth Edwards, Barry John, Phil Bennett, David Duckham, Andy Irvine, Serge Blanco, Ian Kirkpatrick, just to name a few. He started out in 1952 on the radio then when television picked up the game he was a natural to make the move over. His dulcet tones made the game very recognisable all over the world and he will be remembered for it for ever.

He had the knack to make the game look so easy, he had an unparalleled knowledge of the game and made the viewers feel comfortable in his commentaries. He never got over excited when his beloved Scotland won a game and even more so when his son in law actually played at scrum half for Scotland. As a former player, playing for his home town club, Hawick, he knew the game very well indeed and in fact he once had a trial for Scotland, but unfortunately he never made the team.

He was involved in the second world war and came through it unscathed, only for a few years later to be struck down with TB. A disease in those days that many people never recovered from. But luckily for Bill a new drug was found and he was one of the first people to be prescribed it and it saved his life. He has had his ups and downs in his family life, but had came through it.

Now happily retired, he undoubtedly the greatest rugby commentator of all time.

Gordon54

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gordon_Wright

Saturday, 27 March 2010

Interview about the 2010 Six Nations with Martin Johnson

20 top things about Rugby Union that you did not Know



Rugby and football were essentially the same game until 1863. The split occurred when attempts were made to formalise the rules of football, whereupon the Blackheath club quit the new Football Association, wishing to protect players' right to kick one another on the shins.
Initially, the game of rugby was played by teams comprising 20 players.
Rugby is the oldest international team sport, with the first rugby test predating both the first cricket and football tests.
The International Rugby Board was created as the result of a disputed try, in a match between England and Scotland.
The 1895 split between rugby league and rugby union occurred along both class and geographic lines. Clubs in the working class North embraced a professional game, while the wealthier clubs in the South adhered to the ethic of amateur rugby.
The United States is the reigning Olympic rugby gold medallist, having won the last rugby event played at the Olympics, in 1924.
Japan boasts the largest playing pool of any rugby-playing nation, with 125,000 registered players.
Pope John Paul II played rugby for the Polish national team.
The first Gilbert rugby ball was manufactured in the late 1700s by William Gilbert, a cobbler whose business was positioned next to the Rugby school at which the modern game was first played.
The shape of the modern rugby ball is derived from the use of inflated pigs bladders, which were used during the early years of the game.
During the early days of the game only a single point was awarded for a try. A drop goal, however, earned 3 points.
The first test between Western Samoa and Fiji was played at 7am in the morning, on a pitch with a large tree growing in its centre.
The South African rugby team didn't lose a single test series between 1896 and 1956.
World War One had a significant impact on the game of rugby. 133 international players were killed in battles, which resulted in the development of the sport being set back by decades, and also gave football the opportunity to become the most popular game in the United Kingdom.
If Germany had not occupied France during World War Two, rugby league would have been the dominant convention in that country. During the Nazi occupation all the assets of the massive French Rugby League were handed over to the French Rugby Union, and for decades after the war rugby league clubs were not permitted to describe their game as 'rugby'.
The grave of William Webb Ellis, the man credited with inventing rugby, was only located in 1959.
Stellenbosch Rugby Club in South Africa is the largest rugby club in the world with over 7,000 registered players.
Rugby Union is an extremely popular spectator sport in Georgia and Madagascar.
Since turning professional, the popularity of rugby has soared around the globe, with the 2007 Rugby World Cup attracting a cumulative audience of 4 billion. The sport is currently considered the second most popular on the planet, the first being football.
Rugby union is gaining in popularity more rapidly than any other sport in the United States, and the country already boasts a player pool larger than any of the Celtic teams participating in the Six Nations Championship.

Well, there you have it - 20 things you didn't perhaps now about rugby!

Learn more about Six Nations Rugby and how the game it played and bet one from around the world.

Friday, 26 March 2010

The right Rugby Clothing San Francisco Rugby Store

How to wear the right Rugby Clothing


Rugby is a very popular and exciting sport, with many fans both young and old supporting their teams as they work their way through the rugby leagues. Of course, there is a lot of skill, training and dedication shown by rugby players, but one important aspect of the sport that cannot be forgotten is the clothing worn by those playing the game.

It is essential that rugby clothing is hardwearing and suitable for the sport; rugby can be a tough game on both the players and their apparel, and therefore products that aren't going to fall apart at the first scrimmage are essential. There are many well known names in the world of rugby clothing, but one that has a lot of bestselling lines is Kooga. Established in 1997, Kooga is a UK based company specialising in the design and creation of hard wearing and hardy rugby clothing.

Kooga may be UK based, but teams around the world can be seen sporting the Kooga logo. Australia's Queensland Reds, England's Huddersfield Giant's and Japan's Secom Rugguts are just three of the many teams that delight in wearing Kooga products.

However, it isn't just the more famous of rugby players that can afford to wear Kooga, definitely not! Many retailers around the world stock Kooga products at affordable prices, and for good reasons. As the brand is so well known, the items tend to sell well and there is a wide range available to suit most people looking to buy rugby clothing. As there is a junior range, this means even children and younger players are catered for.

Important items of clothing worn by players of sports such as rugby are baselayers. These are items of clothing that fit tightly to the body and are worn under the external clothing used in such sports. The purpose of a baselayer is to provide extra protection and warmth to a player, ensuring they can play at optimum performance. Baselayers can also draw sweat away from the body during play. Many well known brands produce them, and Kooga is no exception.

Kooga baselayers again come in both junior and adult ranges, which help to sell the product to a wide spectrum of customers. The products available in the Kooga baselayer range for rugby includes skin vests, shorts (also known as pants) and t shirts (with both long and short sleeves). It may be that short sleeved Kooga baselayers are worn in warmer conditions, to ensure players do not overheat during the game.

Kooga baselayers are only one item featured in their extensive rugby clothing range, but Kooga also produce sporting accessories for all manner of players; water bottles, aluminium studs for rugby boots, gym bags and shoe bags are all available displaying the Kooga logo. With this wide range of products, it is no wonder Kooga is very much a household name in the world of sports.

If you are looking to buy a Kooga baselayer, or, indeed, any other type of Kooga/sporting product, be sure to buy from a genuine, trustworthy retailers. If buying online, make sure the website is secure and, if in doubt, call the shop to ask.

Established in 1973, Morrant Group Ltd is a family run business with over 35 years experience in mail order team sports equipment. Father, Daughter, Son and staff are working hard every day to ensure that our company achieves its aim. We sell a range of sports gear, including Kooga baselayers and goods. Please visit our website at http://www.morrant.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shantelle_Hynes

Thursday, 25 March 2010

How to perfect the rugby spiral kick

How to punt or kick a Rugby Union ball


Punting is a very important part of the game. Punters like kickers are the most closely scrutinized players on the field. Unlike the other players who can jump off sides, start to early, the punter doesn't get a second chance unless the defense has a penalty. Each punting situation is different. You need to know how to punt the football for each set of circumstances. Do you punt away, quick kick or employ a rugby style kick. Regardless you punters have to get it right the first time. This article will give you the basics of how to punt the football.

Preparing to punt

Preparing to punt starts with your stance. Balance in your stance is vital, have your legs about shoulder width apart and your kicking foot about a half foot width behind your non punting foot.

Your body is squared with line of scrimmage and your arms bent in an L shape with your hands in front of you.

How to receive the snap

With your body squared to the line and hands in front, you are ready to receive the snap. Your eyes must be focused on the long snapper and the ball. Eying the defense and trying to read the rush can cause a muffed snap reception and put your team in a big hole.

As the ball is snapped, watch the ball all the way into your hands. The punting side hand should be on the end of the ball closes to your body.

While you position the ball in your hands, laces up, take a half step with your kicking foot full step with your non punting leg. This will build up the momentum for punting the ball. Your head is down looking at the ball, watching as your punting leg comes up meeting the ball and you kick through the ball.

Different types of punts

Field position or a hard rush can require you to use a different style punt.

***Pooch Punt***

This style of punt is designed to get a lot of air under the ball. You will sacrifice distance for height. To get air under your punt, hold the tip of the ball slightly up and the punt the ball. The more the tip is pointed up, the more air you get under the ball.

***Rugby Kick***

The Rugby Kick can be used to avoid a hard rush or to get a lot of roll on the ball.

Executing the Rugby Kick is taking one step back with your punting foot, and then a side a step, the follow up step is with your kicking foot kicking through the ball. Rugby Kicks don't produce a lot of height, are difficult to get a good run back on and should give you a lot of role.

***Quick Kick***

This punt is used when the snap is slow getting back and or the rush won't allow for a Rugby Kick.

The quick kick is taking one step with the non punting leg and then bringing the kicking leg up, foot meeting the ball with the follow through. You won't get as much height or distance on the ball, but it is better than having your punt blocked or being sacked with the ball.

Wide Snaps

If you get a wide snap, side step to the ball keeping your eyes on the ball and body squared to the line of scrimmage. A cross over step can cost you time or have you tripping over your own feet.

Over the head snaps

If the ball is snapped over your head, turn to the backside and pursue the ball. The backside is the opposite side of your kicking leg. As you come up behind the ball scooping it up you will have your kicking leg on the outside and in position to make the punt.

In conclusion these are the basics of punting. Becoming a successful punter takes more than just knowing how to punt the football.

Learn more about punting, visit us at http://www.scoretouchdowns.com/page/398219246 see our selection of how to punt the football videos.

Complimenting our punter training DVDs is our punting game category offering many excellent punt game coaching videos. http://www.scoretouchdowns.com/page/398509618

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Andrew_Berkey

Wednesday, 24 March 2010

Preparation for the Rugby Union 2011 World cup New Zealand

Great preparation for the Rugby Union 2011 World cup


With the 2011 Rugby World just over a year away, New Zealand is bracing itself for a bombardment of visitors from around the world.

As the number of projected visitors looking to far outstrip the available accommodation there is a great opportunity for home-owners to help solve the accommodation problem and make some great rental returns by renting out their own house or rooms to Rugby World cup visitors.

Here are some suggested steps for successful renting for both Home-owners and Visitors during the Rugby World Cup.

Home-owners and Visitors

After you have agreed on a price and rental duration I recommend that the bond (at least two weeks) and the full rental amount for the period, is deposited to a lawyer's trust account at least three months before the start of the tenancy. Basically the lawyer is acting in an escrow capacity.

That the full rent for the period is paid to the Home-owner only when the Visitor has arrived and taken occupation of the home.

The bond is repaid to the Visitor after a final inspection of the House.

That the above agreement in reflected in a contact that you both sign before the rental starts

Home Owners

I suggest that you ensure that your insurance covers you for any damage done by people legally on your property. This is usually simply a matter of informing your insurance company that for the period of the rental that the house is not owner occupied but is a tenanted house.

Visitors

I suggest that you ensure that the person/people you are renting the house from are legally entitled to rent it, and that the house is in the location and the condition described.

The best way to ensure this is to contact a New Zealand lawyer who can do a property search, contact the owners and if necessary do a property inspection.

Stay In NZ, http://www.stayinnz.com is a specially designed site to help Rugby World Cup Visitors find local accommodation. We also provide links to legal services to assist with transactions and other resources to help both world cup visitors and home owners enjoy their time during the 2011 Rugby World Cup.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Hugh_Calveley

Tuesday, 23 March 2010

How to play Rugby Union like Gonzalo Quesada

One of the all time greats of Rugby Union Gonzalo Quesada


There are a large number of stalwarts of the game of Rugby and one of the most skilled one is from Argentina and he is Gonzalo Quesada. Gonzalo Quesada-Argentina, was born in the year of 1974 on second of May in Buenos Aires in the country of Argentina.

Gonzalo Quesada-Argentina played for the Argentinian rugby union side and won to his credit 36 caps or the headgear of honour while playing at the position of Fly-half from 1996 to 2003. It was on 14th of September, 1996 that Gonzalo Quesada-Argentina made his first test debut against Unites States when he was twenty two years old. The final cap was won by Gonzalo Quesada-Argentina, against Ireland during the 2003 Rugby World Cup on 26th of October 2003.

His talent and skill is quite apparent from the fact that he scored 12 points out of the Argentina’s 15 points though Argentina had to suffer the defeat. Gonzalo Quesada-Argentina, was also the one to score the maximum number of points in the Rugby World Cup 1999 in Wales which were 102 points.

The Argentinian Rugby player Gonzalo Quesada, used to play for the “Hindu Club” alongside the two brothers Nicolas and Juan prior to the 1999 Rugby World up. As a matter of fact, he was also given invitation to play for the Racing “Club de Narbonne Méditerannée” in France after he displayed his talent in the 1999 Rugby World Cup and being the top scorer with 102 points. In the year of 2002, Gonzalo Quesada-Argentina, left Narbonne to join another French Club called “As Beziers Herault” and he still plays for this particular club. As a name for the admiration and praise he is also known as Speedy Gonzales named by the English media.

Sunday, 21 March 2010

The tough job of being a Rugby Union Referee

How to understand the difference hand signals from a Rugby Referee

Many signals that a referee makes are immediately understandable. They reflect the play that has just occurred. Signals are used by the referee to indicate to the players and spectators why penalties have been awarded, when a team has been awarded a free kick, given advantage in play, and for scoring play.

The referee is the person responsible for knowing how much time has been played and is left to be played. When it comes to time, what he says, goes.

Advantage - To indicate that a team has advantage, the referee will stretch his arm out at waist height, pointing it towards the non-offending team. The indication lasts for around five seconds. It means that rather than stop play to give a penalty, the referee is allowing play to continue when the non-offending team are on attack.

Award of Scrum Feed - Feeding the scrum is the team gets to put the ball into the scrum. The referee points his arm towards the team that gets the scrum feed while standing facing the sideline, with his arm horizontal and at waist height.

Forward Pass - The referee makes an emphasized hand gesture as if he has just made an imaginary pass that has gone well forward. He will give the scrum put in to the team that did not make the mistake.

Free-Kick - The referee raises his arm, bent square at the elbow. The arm will be pointing towards the team that has been given the free kick.

Handling in a ruck or scrum - The referee bends forwards and lowers his arm towards the ground. He then moves his arm backwards and forwards as if he has handled an imaginary ball on the ground.

High tackle - The referee will hold is arm straight over his neck, under his chin. This shows to all the players that someone has made an illegal high tackle.

Killing the ball - The referee will point his arm downwards and move it up and down. This shows to all the players on the pitch that a player did not stay on their feet as they joined a ruck.

Knock On - The referee raises his arm above his head and moves his open hand backwards and forwards. Then, he will tap the palm of that hand with the other, to show to all the players that the ball has been knocked forward.

Obstruction - The referee crosses both his arms across his chest, like a pair of open scissors. This indicates to all the players that one player has stopped another illegally.

Penalty Kick - The referee faces the sideline and with his arm straight and angled upwards, points towards the non-offending team. The non-offending team has the options of a penalty kick or a scrum.

Slow Release - The referee brings both his hands to his chest, as if he is holding an imaginary ball. This shows in his opinion a player has not released the ball straight away at the tackle. He will give a penalty to the non-offending side at the place where the offence took place.

Stamping - The referee raises one leg, bent at the knee and then moves it up and down, as if to stamp on an imaginary ball.

Throw In Not Straight at a Line Out - The referee raises one hand above his head with his shoulders in line with the touch line. He will then move that arm backwards and forwards to show the ball was not thrown in straight by the hooker.

Try/Penalty Try - The referee stands on the try line and, facing the team that scored, raises his arm straight above his head while he blows his whistle. His back will be towards the dead ball line.

These signals will help you to understand the game of rugby and get excited when some of the great teams are playing. There are many more things to learn about rugby like about the rugby pitch and rugby scoring. Add these to what you have now mastered with the referee's signals and you will be able to follow some of the great rugby tournaments. Rugby is a very challenging game physically and when people really start to follow it they become extremely passionate supporters of their favourite team.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robee_Dobbie

Saturday, 20 March 2010

New Zealand Rugby Sevens Tournement

How to get Your Adrenaline Pumping with Rugby Sevens


Love Rugby? Wish you had more time to play, or even to watch your favourite players in action? It’s time to book your tickets for the Seven (7s) Rugby Festival at Bournemouth, UK. The Bournemouth Rugby tour brings together the best performing teams from the nation in a grand finale that surpasses any other Rugby Sevens event in the region.

Rugby Sevens is a growing phenomenon, and what began in early 1900s as a localized adaptation of the popular Rugby format, is now becoming one of the most acceptable ways to play this exciting game. In Rugby sevens speed is the key because everything is running against the clock. That’s why the Bournemouth Rugby tour has attracted so much attention in UK. Rugby fans looking for a thrilling time attended the Seven (7s) Rugby festival at Bournemouth and had such a fun time that they told everybody about the Bournemouth Rugby Tour.

The festival is held in May when the weather is suitable for a good, energetic game of Rugby. The teams who’ve performed well through the year meet to discover who will be the ultimate champion. Unlike a regular Rugby game, only seven players from the each time are allowed on the field and the game lasts from 7 to 10 minutes. This makes the Bournemouth Rugby tour an event chock-filled with quick delights. With one game happening after the other, you’ll never get a chance to settle down in the Seven (7s) Rugby festival.

The best thing about a Sevens tournament is that it doesn’t last very long. The Bournemouth Rugby Tour starts on a Friday and is done by Sunday. A tournament of regular Rugby matches would not end in a week. If you can’t make that kind of investment in Rugby anymore, it’s better to attend the Sevens (7s) Rugby Festival instead and have the same kind of Rugby fun in a lot less time.

The details of the Bournemouth Rugby tour are available on the Internet, and you can keep a tab on the teams that will be participating. Even the tickets to the Seven (7s) Rugby festival are available online and you can book them easily.

Another good thing about the Bournemouth Rugby Tour is that it will be alongside a Netball tournament and a music festival. This means that there’s ample opportunity for everyone in the family. If you are a Rugby fan, and your wife and children are not, you can still bring them along to participate in the music and Netball events while you take part in the Seven (7s) Rugby festival. This way everyone can have a great shared vacation.

Many Rugby fans believe that Sevens will be the dominating Rugby format in the years to come due to its instant results, and extra energy and that Seven (7s) Rugby festival will be held in more and more places. Others are afraid this will dilute the game of Rugby, the proponents say that it will contribute to keeping Rugby alive and healthy in the hearts of fans who are too busy with the pressures of job and life.

So if you’re one of these Rugby fans who wants to connect with the game, participate in the Bournemouth Rugby Tour for a complete weekend of nothing but pure Rugby.
Author Resource:- For more resources about Sevens (7s) Rugby Festival or even about Bournemouth Rugby Tour please review this page http://www.bournemouthsevens.com

Friday, 19 March 2010

How safe is Rugby Headgear

How Rugby headgear works - or not


International Rugby Board rules prohibit the use of any type of equipment that could potentially cause harm to another player. This rules out metal, hard plastic or any other type of rigid material, with the exception of strictly regulated types of studs on rugby boots. Traditional rugby headguards, also known as scrum caps or ear protectors, are thin cloth caps or headbands with a little padding to protect the player's ears, which are particularly vulnerable to permanent injury. In recent years, protective rugby headgear with soft padding around the head has become increasingly popular. Greater importance is given to keeping the brain and mental faculties safe, and less to the possible "lack of manliness" that the wearing of such protective headgear might suggest. Although optional is most countries, protective rugby headgear is mandatory in Japan and for some Canadian teams. In Australia, there is currently a somewhat controversial movement to make rugby headguards mandatory for Junior Rugby players. Such headguards have been shown to reduce soft tissue damage and absorb some of the shock of blows to the head. And although studies have shown that protective rugby head wear does not reduce the incidence of concussions, it can reduce the severity of concussions and the length of recovery time.

High cost and discomfort of scrum caps are two main objections that many rugby players have raised. Thanks to such up to date technology, rugby scrum caps are now affordable and made with innovative materials that are comfortable, lightweight yet affordable materials that are lightweight, and have a greater ability to absorb shocks. When buying, numerous factors need to be considered. First, the headguard must bear the official International Rugby Board logo. All headguards that have not had the proper approval by the International Rugby Board are not to be used in a rugby match. It is also important that the headguard is comfortable and fits properly. The head guard should fit securely to the head and have cloth laces or Velcro straps that hold it firmly in place. Essential ventilation is also required to add comfort and to ensure hearing. Because rugby headgear is available in many different shapes and sizes, it is imperative for rugby players to try them on before purchase. A headguard that does not fit correctly will be uncomfortable and will be less likely to be worn.

Rugby headgear also requires proper care and maintenance in order to be most effective. Prior to each practice or game, laces and straps should be re-adjusted to ensure that the cap fits properly, ensuring it fits tight and secure. After every time used, the scrum cap needs to be be disinfected with a bleach and water solution to keep bacteria and at bay. Rugby headgear must be replaced each year, because even the most durable materials can weaken after repeated assault. Headguards are still not coompulsary in the majority of the world and may well be optional for some years to come. Despite this, contemporary scientific and medical knowledge of the true costs of head injuries combined with comfortable and affordable equipment options may inspire more rugby players to seriously consider protective rugby headgear.

Planning on investing in a Rugby Headguard?, visit ==> Rugby Headguards

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Nick_Gent

Thursday, 18 March 2010

How to Scrum in Rugby Union

How and Why Do Rugby Players Scrum and Maul at Such Different Body Heights?


Scrums and mauls are the two great dominance contests within the game of rugby. Marked superiority in either of these forms of engagement can affect the morale of both teams in a way that a corresponding supremacy at say the lineout does not.

Forward packs spend countless hours developing scrum technique but very much less attention is given to the maul, particularly in a defensive situation. Scrums are also elaborately structured whereas mauls tend to be chaotic. To a large extent this is due to the relative extent to which the two are regulated by the Laws of Rugby. Law 20, relating to the scrum, comprises three times as many pages as Law 17 pertaining to the maul.

Unlike the scrum, the Laws are largely silent on what players can do in the maul. Within the maul itself the most relevant clauses are that "Players joining a maul must have their heads and shoulders no lower than their hips" (17.2 (a)); they "must endeavour to stay on their feet" (17.2 (d)); and "A player must not intentionally collapse a maul" (17.2 (e)). Thus there remains considerable latitude for creativity.

One very marked difference between the two contests is that in the scrum either pack, whether having the feed or not, has the opportunity to establish dominance and drive the other pack back. By contrast it is very rare in the maul for the side not in possession to gain significant ground. This is largely due to the fact that the team with the ball is able to surreptitiously transfer the ball laterally from hand to hand so that the push from their opponents bypasses the ball-carrier, allowing him to be driven forward more or less unimpeded.

I believe that players can be trained to maul much more effectively and the secret is body height. In a typical situation where a maul forms the ball carrier stands upright, making no attempt to crouch. A team mate may attempt to seal off the ball with his shoulder at chest height of the ball-carrier. The first opposing player binds on the ball-carrier at waist height. None of these players would have their legs positioned to exert an effective forward shove.

The body height adopted by the first players engaging from each team usually defines the height of their side of the ensuing maul. Subsequent players typically bind against the buttocks of the players in front of them. Players arriving at a maul tend to simply bend at the waist when joining the contest.

Compare the likely height of this maul with the body height of the same players in a scrum situation. It can be confidently anticipated that body heights would be at least 300mm lower in a scrum than in a maul.

If the first defending player were to bind around the thighs of his opponent rather than the waist, he would create a platform for his team mates to bind at something close to scrummaging height. Each of the players is then likely to have optimal hip and knee joint angles for generating forward momentum. It might even be advantageous for players to adopt the second-rower's technique of binding between the thighs of the player in front, whether team mate or foe. The one essential requirement is that players packing low secure a very firm grip to avoid being penalised for going to ground.

While front row players in the scrum are prohibited from "lifting or forcing an opponent up" (20.8 (i)), there is no corresponding restriction in relation to mauls. Although lifting is treated as "dangerous play" in the scrum, it does not have the same connotation in the maul where players are bound in an unstructured way and not confined or compressed as in the scrum. With his shoulder under his opponent's buttocks a player is ideally placed to drive up, forcing the opponent to give ground.

While mauls are often formed in an unstructured way, many of them emerge from static engagements such as the lineout or where the ball is being contested after a tackle. In such a situation a well-drilled team would have the opportunity to rapidly adopt a pseudo-scrum formation and drive forward. Not only are they likely to gain advantage in that particular maul, but the practice of adopting biomechanically superior body positions will undoubtedly be energy-conserving over the course of a game.

Bruce Ross is CEO of MyoQuip, manufacturers of variable-resistance strength machines including the rugby-specific ScrumTruk MyoQuip - variable resistance strength equipment MyoQuip Blog - strength equipment, rugby football

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_Ross

Wednesday, 17 March 2010

How to play Rugby - America guide!

How Rugby is played - the beginners guide

At first glance, rugby can appear a confusing and complicated game. Many object to their family and friends becoming too engrossed in watching the sport on TV purely because they do not know enough about the game to follow play well enough. Look further into it and it becomes clear that rugby is an exciting and well structured sport which is a pleasure to watch. What initially appears to be a game that is quite random, actually its quite complex.

Ruby is currently played in over 120 countries and it is rich in tradition and community involvement. You often find that the skill is passed down through generations and families tend to be committed the sport throughout many years.

Children may start to play rugby through the non-contact version. This allows them to perfect their skills and knowledge of the game without the physical strain of the contact version. It is still important however that you ensure your child has adequate rugby protection even if they are playing the non-contact version of the game as it is still quite physically demanding and there is always the chance of injury if they are not protected. With children as young as six enjoying the game you will want to ensure they have the correct rugby protection.

When your child moves onto a senior rugby club they will begin to experience the camaraderie that distinguishes this sport from many others. Rugby truly is a team sport with every member of the team playing an important part with recognisable skill. By including your son or daughter in the sport of rugby you all helping them develop an important part of themselves through becoming part of a team. Many schools offer the opportunity to participate in the sport of rugby and as long as your child has adequate rugby protection, they will be allowed to participate.

While you can continue playing rugby well into your adult years, very few move on to become professional rugby players. You may find that it suits you best to become a coach or referee or even volunteer for a local school or club in order to carry on your passion for the sport.

If you take the time to watch a game of ruby and look beyond the seeming disorganisation of players in their rugby protection running around with the strangely shaped ball, you will find a sport that has a continuous flow and constant competition. It is very calculated and precise and takes a lot of skill. Points are scored throughout the game through carrying, passing, kicking and grounding the ball and the team scoring the most points becomes the victor.

So next time you are watching TV at the weekend and come across the sport of rugby, you may want to take a moment to watch and think about how it is a community sport that encourages commitment and team work. Beyond the rugby equipment and dirty uniforms lies a sport of history and values that add to our neighbourhoods and homes in a very positive way.

Established in 1973, Morrant Group Ltd is a family run business with over 35 years experience in mail order team sports equipment. Father, Daughter, Son and staff are working hard every day to ensure that our company achieves its aim. We sell a range of sports gear, including rugby protection and goods. Please visit our website at http://www.morrant.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shantelle_Hynes

Tuesday, 16 March 2010

How to perform a Rugby tackle taught by the master

7 steps to making a Rugby Tackle

Tackling in rugby is one of the most important aspects of the game. It is crucial to be able to bring an opponent down quickly and efficiently. Certain skills and tips can be applied when performing a proper tackle. These steps can be applied to any rugby position on the field because everyone must have the ability to tackle.

1. Approach- Much like football, you want to approach the ball carrier quickly in order to limit the amount of open space the runner has. The more space available, the harder the tackle will be. If approaching from the side, be sure to take the proper angle and do not over commit, allowing the runner to cut back inside of you.

2. Break Down- It is important to break down before coming into a tackle. Personally, I find it best to break down roughly 5-6 yards before making a tackle. A good break down stance is low and square to the runner. If you run into a tackle without breaking down, it is very likely that you will run right past the ball carrier.

3. Lock on- The best place to position your eyes are on the hips of your opponent. A ball carrier's hips will indicate where he wants to go. The ball carrier will try to fake you out with head and shoulder fakes so it is important to completely ignore those movements.

4. Initiate contact- Do not let the ball carrier initiate first contact. By making the contact, you have the momentum and force necessary to bring your opponent to the ground. By surrendering first contact, you give the runner the ability to run right over or past you.

*Important: Do not tackle above the armpits or leave your feet. Such moves are called a "dangerous tackle" and will result in a penalty.

5. Head-Up- Keeping your head upright serves two purposes. First, if you put your head down, you may lose sight of the ball carrier and you can easily miss your tackle. Second, it is dangerous to lead with your head down when making a tackle. The force could snap your neck, leading to serious injury. Position your head to the side of the ball carrier, underneath their armpit.

6. Wrap-Up- You must wrap your arms up and around the waist or legs of your opponent. Once your arms are wrapped, grab onto anything you can, either your own wrist or jersey of the ball carrier. Having a strong grasp is essential so there will be no chance of a broken tackle.

7. Drive Legs- Drive your legs and run right through the ball carrier. Do not stop running your legs at the start of contact. Do not pick the ball carrier up but, drive low and hard until the opponent is on the ground.

These are the most crucial steps to making a proper tackle in rugby. When followed correctly, a sure tackle can be made. If completely outmatched in size, adjust these steps to initiate contact lower, around thigh level.

Devin Cassinelli is a Sport Management major at Nichols College. Devin is also an active participant in the Nichols College Club Rugby team.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Devin_Cassinelli

Monday, 15 March 2010

The best Rugby Players in the World

Why Do Rugby Players Scrum and Maul at Such Different Body Heights?

Scrums and mauls are the two great dominance contests within the game of rugby. Marked superiority in either of these forms of engagement can affect the morale of both teams in a way that a corresponding supremacy at say the lineout does not.

Forward packs spend countless hours developing scrum technique but very much less attention is given to the maul, particularly in a defensive situation. Scrums are also elaborately structured whereas mauls tend to be chaotic. To a large extent this is due to the relative extent to which the two are regulated by the Laws of Rugby. Law 20, relating to the scrum, comprises three times as many pages as Law 17 pertaining to the maul.

Unlike the scrum, the Laws are largely silent on what players can do in the maul. Within the maul itself the most relevant clauses are that "Players joining a maul must have their heads and shoulders no lower than their hips" (17.2 (a)); they "must endeavour to stay on their feet" (17.2 (d)); and "A player must not intentionally collapse a maul" (17.2 (e)). Thus there remains considerable latitude for creativity.

One very marked difference between the two contests is that in the scrum either pack, whether having the feed or not, has the opportunity to establish dominance and drive the other pack back. By contrast it is very rare in the maul for the side not in possession to gain significant ground. This is largely due to the fact that the team with the ball is able to surreptitiously transfer the ball laterally from hand to hand so that the push from their opponents bypasses the ball-carrier, allowing him to be driven forward more or less unimpeded.

I believe that players can be trained to maul much more effectively and the secret is body height. In a typical situation where a maul forms the ball carrier stands upright, making no attempt to crouch. A team mate may attempt to seal off the ball with his shoulder at chest height of the ball-carrier. The first opposing player binds on the ball-carrier at waist height. None of these players would have their legs positioned to exert an effective forward shove.

The body height adopted by the first players engaging from each team usually defines the height of their side of the ensuing maul. Subsequent players typically bind against the buttocks of the players in front of them. Players arriving at a maul tend to simply bend at the waist when joining the contest.

Compare the likely height of this maul with the body height of the same players in a scrum situation. It can be confidently anticipated that body heights would be at least 300mm lower in a scrum than in a maul.

If the first defending player were to bind around the thighs of his opponent rather than the waist, he would create a platform for his team mates to bind at something close to scrummaging height. Each of the players is then likely to have optimal hip and knee joint angles for generating forward momentum. It might even be advantageous for players to adopt the second-rower's technique of binding between the thighs of the player in front, whether team mate or foe. The one essential requirement is that players packing low secure a very firm grip to avoid being penalised for going to ground.

While front row players in the scrum are prohibited from "lifting or forcing an opponent up" (20.8 (i)), there is no corresponding restriction in relation to mauls. Although lifting is treated as "dangerous play" in the scrum, it does not have the same connotation in the maul where players are bound in an unstructured way and not confined or compressed as in the scrum. With his shoulder under his opponent's buttocks a player is ideally placed to drive up, forcing the opponent to give ground.

While mauls are often formed in an unstructured way, many of them emerge from static engagements such as the lineout or where the ball is being contested after a tackle. In such a situation a well-drilled team would have the opportunity to rapidly adopt a pseudo-scrum formation and drive forward. Not only are they likely to gain advantage in that particular maul, but the practice of adopting biomechanically superior body positions will undoubtedly be energy-conserving over the course of a game.

Bruce Ross is CEO of MyoQuip, manufacturers of variable-resistance strength machines including the rugby-specific ScrumTruk MyoQuip - variable resistance strength equipment MyoQuip Blog - strength equipment, rugby football

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_Ross

Sunday, 14 March 2010

How to score the greatest six nations tries

The History of the Rugby Union six nations

The Six Nations inspires fervour in the sporting world, unlike that of any other sporting event. Fans paint themselves in patriotic colours, buy up the stocks of the latest rugby shirts and travel from country to country to offer their team their unconditional support. It is a sport of the moment and has thrown itself, in all its vitality and glory, spectacularly into the 21st Century. But how many fans are aware of its colourful and sometimes controversial past?

The Six Nations is 126 years old. It began in 1882, when England travelled to Swansea; the importance of the occasion would not be realised until much later. As it was known then, the International Championship featured only England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales and was far less organised than the standards set by today's games. The points system had not been structured at that time and teams were judged on a much more basic level: simply, whether they won or lost. Notwithstanding, the first match was won by England, who beat the Welsh by two goals and four tries to none. This first match ignited a spirit of pride and competition that swept the northern hemisphere.

However, the following series of matches were dogged by dispute and the games of 1885, 1887 and 1889 could not be completed. When the French joined in 1910, they initially struggled to perform with any distinction, triumphing in only one game over their first four years by beating Scotland by one point in 1911.

Three years later, the tournament was called to a halt until 1920 - thanks to the outbreak of the Great War. When it was re-established, it was again a source of dispute and violence: Welsh crowds repeatedly invaded the pitch and, on more than one occasion, threatened to lynch the referee. In the decade that followed the First World War, the French were expelled after players were exposed for carrying stiletto knives in their socks. The team were again ousted in 1931, after a number of their team were found to have been paid at club level.

The tournament was again postponed as the result of another war; this time, World War 2. The championship did not see play for seven years, from the eruption of the War in 1940.

In the 1950's, however, France had left its scurrilous past behind and underwent a renaissance of their game, sharing the title in 1954 and winning out-and-out in 1959.

The 1970's were a golden era for the proud Welsh nation. During that decade they achieved three Grand Slams and a triple crown, establishing them as a force to be reckoned with. The French rose again in the eighties, winning outright on no less than three occasions.

England joined France in the 90's as the tournament's main aggressors, but this led to speculation that the standard of competition was not high enough. In turn, this led to Italy being invited to join in 2000 and the Six Nations was officially borne.

Now, the tournament has produced a new generation of rugby fans and inspired a merchandise industry that can put football to shame. Dedicated fans scour websites, such as lovell-rugby.co.uk, determined to display their pride in any way they can. Once again the northern hemisphere will be awash with rugby shirts, polo shirts and caps as fans offer homage to the sporting giants that represent them.

Visit Lovell Rugby [http://www.lovell-rugby.co.uk] for great prices on rugby shirts, rugby boots and other rugby equipment. Permission is granted to publish this article electronically provided that a working hyperlink remains to our website.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eddie_J_Bent

Saturday, 13 March 2010

Six nations Rugby 2010 Italy v England

Have Ireland Got What it Takes to Repeat the Rugby Six Nations Glory?

France are favourites to win the 2010 Six Nations, which seems a trifle odd, considering 2009 Grand Slam winners, Ireland, have gone through 2009 unbeaten, proving in the process that they can take on the best in the world and beat them.

Under coach Declan Kidney, Ireland have blossomed into an outstanding outfit, with a world class set of players and a game that personifies a commitment to total rugby. On top of that lays the fact that their two principle club sides, Leinster and Munster are playing at the top of their games right now meaning that the Ireland players will come into the Six Nations in top form.

Ireland certainly finished 2009 as the best side in the Northern Hemisphere and is currently ranked fourth in the world behind South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. It should also be remembered that they have not tasted defeat since November 2008 when they lost at home to New Zealand.

Many argue that this is the best squad of players that Ireland have ever had, they have balance all round and boast some of the best backs anywhere in rugby. With the emergence of players such as Jonathan Sexton at Fly Half they appear to have a solid future too.

If there is a doubt about Ireland's claims to win the Six Nations for a second successive year it lays in the fact that their two away games are against France on 13 Feb and England on 27 Feb. Their away record against these two sides is not great and Kidney will know that he will have to win at least one of them if they are to win the Championship.

Most impartial rugby fans would certainly support an Ireland repeat Six Nations success particularly as it would serve as great testimony for Ireland's best player, Brian O'Driscoll. Cruelly deprived of participation on the British Lions tour of New Zealand in 2005, following an outrageous tackle by Kiwi captain Tana Umaga and Keven Mealamu, the Irish captain has bounced back and was quite rightly voted the Six Nations Player of the Series last season. The biggest disappointment however for him and for rugby fans was the dreadful decision to deny him the captaincy of the latest British Lions tour to South Africa in favour of Irish teammate Paul O'Connell. For that reason alone an Ireland and O'Driscoll Six Nations triumph will be the perfect tonic and a great start to the New Year.

Find out more about the 6 nations tournament and a full preview of Ireland's chances as well as all the six nations betting ahead of the tournament.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_R_Smith

Friday, 12 March 2010

How to get Bigger - stronger - faster in the sport of Rugby Union

How to do Functional Strength Training For the Sport of Rugby

It is almost the end of the annual Tri Nations series and the Springboks (South Africa) are on route to win the series. The Tri Nations sees the world's heavy weights in rugby union take each other on in a series of Test matches. The past decade has seen Rugby Union being dominated by the three Southern Hemisphere heavy weights -- Australia (the Wallabies), South Africa (the Springboks) and New Zealand (the All Blacks) up until England's world cup victory in 2003 with all credit given to Jonny Wilkinson. This year's Tri Nations has seen New Zealand retain the Bledisloe cup (the coveted cup between Australia and New Zealand) however the series win itself is possibly going to be in the hands of the Springboks.

Rugby Union is a full-contact physical game. In most cases there is no use of padding whatsoever and it's only in the recent years that we have seen mouth guards being used. Head padding is becoming more popular given the notorious reputation Rugby players have of owning a pair of 'cauliflower ears' (The term use to describe repaired ears after the surgeons have done some work on them). Adding to the nature of the game, players tend to adorn metallic studded boots. Attempting to tackle a player from behind while chasing often tends to put one at risk of tooth-to-metal impact.

The game is about possession and territory. The ball is never to be lost to the opposing team and you work hard to gain territory as you advance. The strategies used are very similar to combat movements. Advancements are physical and brutal. They involve using brute force to break through the opposing team's defenses without being grounded. 'Grounded' is being tackled and often involves being thrown to the floor. It stands to no surprise that most levels of Rugby require the presence of paramedics.

The physical war like nature of the game has meant that players must prepare themselves for combat and become warriors. This is part and parcel of what made Jonah Lomu and David Campese such try-making machines in the past. England players vividly remember the time Jonah broke through waves of defense before scoring five tries against them in the 1995 world cup. Whilst Campo (David Campese) is likely to spend most of his time in his rugby shop at the Rocks in Sydney dreaming of the days he pummeled through the All Black defenses.

As strength training was critical to Gladiators in the days of ancient Rome, so is strength training critical in this full-contact physical sport. A look at the South African team in the Tri Nations 2009 reveals how a strong team is able to pummel its way to victory. The Springbok forwards were unstoppable. There defenses impenetrable. There attacks -- in waves of tsunami.

Traditional Rugby Strength training has revolved around keeping players' legs strong and thick. This meant hours of training on squatting and hack squat machines. The aim of this was to build up leg strength for the players as this would be pivotal in ploughing forward on the field; particularly in the scrum and mauls. However, the world of strength training itself has changed dramatically and functional strength training is now critical to dominate the game. A look at Jerry Collins' arms reveals very clearly that he doesn't necessarily only squat at the gym!

Functional strength training is what differentiates a mediocre rugby player from a warrior.

Functional strength training addresses every single movement used in the game of rugby and strength training for it. For example players need to build there strength to address the scrum (varying positions), mauls, charging, tackling, handing off, the line out and explosive bursts of energy. Functional strength training involves taking every aspect of the game and breaking it down into manageable units; e.g. the line out -- Players need to build strong shoulders/deltoid muscles as well as strong quads and hams to address this movement. This movement could be strengthened using exercises such as Barbell Thrusters. Handing off opponents involves the use of triceps, shoulders, the chest and back muscles. These individual muscle groups need to be strengthened.

Traditional workout routines for rugby involved focusing on the legs only and other non-targeted routines which seriously short changed players who are in essence going out to war. Military personnel are beginning to realize these changes and are training there soldiers in preparation for varying combat situations e.g. strength training for urban combat is different to jungle combat. You cannot be just physically fit any longer but one needs to be functionally strong and fit. For example urban combat requires soldiers to be able to lift rubble and pieces of concrete, climb up stairs with heavy gear on their backs, pull themselves up walls, etc.

Functional strength training for Rugby involves targeted strategic attacks on muscle groups and provides a decisive action plan to strengthen functional elements of the game.

The Free eBook Rugby Blitz found at the link below directly addresses Functional Strength Training for the Sport of Rugby Union / League. It describes 10 rules to take Rugby players from Rugby Mediocrity to being a Rugby Warrior. http://www.StrengthTrainingChronicles.com

I've been lifting weights on and off for about 10 years now. The most I've benched to this point is 184Kgs at the age of 27. I'm setting myself the goal of benching 200 Kgs by the end of 2009. After which, I m going to attempt heavier; maybe 220 - 240 Kgs.

Join me on this journey. I will also give you some thoughts of mine on life, its purpose, how I've gone through some difficult patches without being burnt and what I look forward to in the future.

http://www.StrengthTrainingChronicles.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Johann_Tambayah

Thursday, 11 March 2010

The History of Rugby Union

The history of Rugby Union

Rugby is a game that the average American is not too familiar with. Consider the episode of Friends in which Ross tried to impress Emily by playing rugby with her brothers and a bunch of their friends. The problem? Ross knew nothing of rugby, how to play or the rules of rugby. What happened was inevitable. Ross spent some time in the emergency room with Emily tending to him. That could happen to anyone who does not know the rules of the history of this sport. In fact, the players playing this game have gotten so rough that players have actually died from this sport.

The history of rugby is a long one. Some scholars believe it can be traced back to the ancient Romans but this history will be brief. The most popular view on when rugby began is in 1823 when William Webb Ellis ran with the football in his arms instead of using his feet to kick it. This coincides with the theory that somewhere in the decade between 1820 and 1830, players who ran with the ball were accepted into the playing field. A player named Jem Mackie, who was a powerful player, actually helped cement this way of playing into the game during 1838 and 1839. However it was not a legal way to play until the 1841 to 1842 season of rugby.

Because the play of rugby was so dangerous, official rules were established on August 28, 1845. For fifteen years, these rules governed how the game was played by everyone with one exception. In 1848, the Cambridge Rules were established, which concerned the use of the players' hands and the football. There was a ban on the acts of 'hacking', 'tripping', and using the hands to hold the ball while running toward the opposite goal after the ball had been caught. This ban began in 1863. Today, though, the rules resemble the Cambridge rules.

The original ball was made from a pig's bladder, which had to be blown up before every game. The bladder was usually one that was fresh from a pig, so the chore of blowing the ball up did not appeal to many players. The length of the ball now is meant to be 11 to 11.25 inches. Its circumferences should be 30 to 31 inches in the biggest part and 25.5 to 26 inches in the width. It should weigh 12 to 13 ounces and should be hand sewn, with no more than 8 stitches per inch of the ball.

If this is the sport you choose, be cautious about the way you protect yourself. There are no helmets in the regulation uniforms, but a smart player would use one. Shin guards, knee pads, elbow guards, and a chest plate would also be wise to use, as this sport can get very rough. Also, for the first game or so, watching how it is played would be a wise thing, as it can change and turn without warning, causing harm to the players involved.

Ethan has been an online writer for nearly 2 years now. Not only does this author specialize in sports, finance, and product reviews, you can also check out his latest website on Canon CB-2LX which reviews and lists the best Canon CB-2LX Charger for your Canon rechargeable digital camera.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ethan_D_Orman

Wednesday, 10 March 2010

Awesome Junior Rugby - Raptors - U14s Round

7 Traits of a Champion Rugby Junior Team

I experienced 12 years of junior rugby union in the heart of Reds territory during the 1970's and 1980's at club and school (GPS) levels. Ballimore were the halo grounds we kids dreamt of playing on at the end of the season during the finals. I was particularly blessed and had numerous runs onto the concave surface representing the Kenmore Bears Rugby Union Club, as a halfback. Because of these experiences and the dedication of my coach from Under 7 to Under 13, I decided to give something back to the game I loved and coach a junior rugby union team, modelled on how I was coached.

The first year I coached the Under 9 Wests Junior Rugby Union team. Being in control of 15+ Under 9 was an eye opener, particularly for a 24 year old who had no babysitting experience! A well planned session based on my Queensland Rugby coaching manual, "The Game Played in Heaven", which included large varieties of stretches/fitness & skill drills/games/moves..., created an exciting, informative and smooth running session for all. It was a great reward to see the players improving every week, building in confidence and skills. We had a number of losses at the start, however, we came back and beat most of the teams in the second round and found ourselves at the top of the ladder at the end of the year. With great disappointment, my 2 year of coaching the same team, Under 10's now, was cut short with work commitments. Their progress through the first part of the year was admirable. They had become a champion team.

Our Kenmore Bears, back when I was playing, were a champion team too! What qualities do a champion Rugby Union team display? Every training session and every match day my coach and I installed 7 important traits on our team:

1. Go Forward - The aim of the game is to put the ball over the try line. This can only be achieved by going forward. Through the middle is the fastest way!

2. Protect the Ball - You can't go forward and score a try without the ball, nor can the opposition! Secure that ball.

3. Support the Ball Carrier - Give the ball carrier options and don't let him get isolated!

4. Continuity - Continuous/Exciting play is a result of going forward, protecting the ball and supporting the ball carrier!

5. Fair Play - Penalties just gives the ball and territory to the opposition!

6. Versatility - Players given the opportunity to play in numerous positions create a greater scope and skills of the game.

7. Most important, Have Fun!

Good Coaching!

By Darrin Read

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Darrin_Read

Tuesday, 9 March 2010

5 great Rugby training skills performed by a world class player/trainer

6 great steps to perform Rugby Player Training Programs

When rugby players use strength training programs to help improve their game they should approach it with very specific goals in mind. At the same time it should be kept as simple as possible, especially if the player is inexperienced.

Before a program is written the player needs to be assessed. If a good coach or trainer is available this will make the whole process much easier. If not, the player can do something of a self-assessment that can be used to design an appropriate program.

The assessment process starts with questions. These questions identify what the player wants to achieve from the training. The person designing the program needs to consider both the player and the coach when assessing. The players own goals for the game are obviously the primary concern but the coach may have certain qualities they want the player to develop. Because they choose the team it makes sense to include them. The player may wish to make a representative team so it would be wise to get input from the coach or selector of that team if possible as well.

By looking at what the player wants to gain, and looking at what he needs to work on to please the coaches, the designer already has a basic framework to start from. The next step is to look at how the player functions or moves, then how that compares with how they will need to function and move in order perform at their target level. Strengths or weaknesses uncovered in this step will further refine the program towards the players specific needs which will in turn advance them towards their goal. The possible tests for this step are endless, but should also follow a process of refinement.

For example a player may desire more speed over 40 meters. The trainer needs to know how fast the player can run over 40 meters, then examine how he runs, then identify what can be done to improve it. Just because its a training program it does not mean that it should all be about lifting weights or strength training. Its about achieving a goal. It could be that the player is held back over the 40 meters by tight hamstrings plus weak quadriceps. Strength work would obviously apply to training the quads, but mobility rather then weightlifting would be needed for the hamstrings to improve.This approach targets the players specific needs, getting him to his goal efficiently and effectively.

A training program finds, then addresses needs in such a way that it uses every available tool in the most appropriate way. By using those tools in a well directed, focused manner, time is saved, so goals are achieved faster. Generic training programs are a wasted opportunity for people to really work on what they need for improvement.

Good program design will deliver an accurate set of guidelines for the player to follow. This need not be a complicated process but it will require some effort in the early stages to do the assessments, plus get input from strength or athletic performance experts if its needed, however the pay off at the end makes all the attention to detail well worthwhile.

I'm an ex-rugby and league player now power lifting for sport instead. I work with players from one a local rugby club in Christchurch New Zealand. I have a site dedicated to green lipped mussel health foods as it's a supplement players can benefit from a lot. Its also a Kiwi made product. The site is http://www.greenlippedmussels.info if you'd like to take a look.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Graeme_Uden

Monday, 8 March 2010

The Incredible Rugby master - Jonah Lomu

The top Rugby Championships And World-Wide Competitions

Rugby is intense, fast-paced, and stimulating game. Though football is the most-watched sport in history, rugby has an international base of fans that is growing all the time. Unlike cricket, rugby tickets have been popularized in more than just former British colonies, it's accepted all over Europe and South America, as well as Australia, South Africa, the US, etc.

But what makes a successful rugby tournament? Sure, rugby itself is an exciting sport, it moves rapidly, there are many ways to score points, and the fans are almost as intense as the players themselves. But not all rugby tournaments are created equal.

Played every four years, the winner of the Rugby World Cup becomes the reigning world champion of rugby the utmost honour in rugby. The current champions are South Africa, claiming the cup from England, the 2003 World Cup champions, in the 2007 Rugby World Cup. In the Rugby World Cup tournament, twenty countries compete in a host nation for around one month getting rugby tickets for this can be very difficult. Four groups of five teams compete against each other, narrowing the opposition to four teams, then two teams, then a champion. The bonus points system is utilized in the Rugby World Cup, making matches exhilarating and often resulting in unexpected wins.

Another of the greatest Rugby tournaments in the world, the Six Nations tournament, began in 1883, when England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland competed in what was called the Home International Championship. Then, in 1910, France joined the competition, which was rechristened Five Nations. When Italy joined in the year 2000, the tournament became known as the Six Nations Championship, the title we know it by today. There are many things that make the Six Nations Championship such a thriving rugby tournament, and Six Nations tickets such desirable items.

Another very successful Rugby touring team that many purchase international rugby tickets for is the British Lions, or the British and Irish Lions. The British Lions has terrific players from England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, and is a touring team that plays Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand every four years.

One thing that most of the greatest international rugby tours use to make tournaments more fun to watch is the bonus point system. This system encourages the kind of play that fans prefer that really sells rugby tickets. Rugby players are encouraged to attack throughout the match in order to obtain bonus points. This gives even losing teams a bonus for trying, they obtain points for small losses and number of tries. Like with normal point systems, teams get one point for a draw and two points for a win.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Wayne_Helmore

Sunday, 7 March 2010

1 perfect drill for great tackling in Rugby

How to be a great Rugby Coach

The game of rugby, be it Union or League, can seem complicated to outsiders or casual spectators of the sport but to rugby coaches the game of rugby is organised down to fine details. Even the unpredictable bouncing and rolling of the oblong rugby ball is taken into consideration for plays and strategies meaning that the task of being a rugby coach can be one of the most complicated and unpredictable coaching jobs around.

As a Rugby coach you will have plenty on your plate from choosing which players are best suited to each position on the field to all of the signature sequences in Rugby from line outs to scrums. These situations occur many times in a game of rugby, there are some situations that can be the deciding factor in a game and so practicing these situations should put your team in good stead to come up with the goods when the game is on the line.

The role of a rugby coach is vital in making sure the team stays focused and adheres to tactics or strategies, like any sport the heat of the moment and pressure to perform can make some players unsure or make a mistake, as a coach you can prepare your team for this pressure as well as give clear instruction from the dugout or the half time huddle.

As well as having a commanding presence and knowledge of tactics you need to mould your team and this is done through fitness and conditioning training. Rugby players are not just huge, daunting characters but they need to be able to last the full length of the game providing just as much intensity as the final whistle blows as when they take the first kick. Not only is strength a key factor to build on but also speed, as the faster player will be able to outrun the opponent trying to tackle them.

Injuries are rife in rugby, as is in any contact sport, there are training tips and drills that can help your players avoid injuries which could rule them out of games or prolonged periods of time. There are also tips for helping to recover from injuries that you may need to know and impart to your players as many grass roots rugby squads may not have the luxury of a dedicated physiotherapist on the sidelines.

Being a rugby coach certainly has some high demands but the rewards of coaching like in any sport can make it all worthwhile.

To ensure your equipment, players and your own safety then you should consider a dedicated rugby coach insurance policy, this specialist sport insurance cover protects you against many issues that could happen in the line of coaching rugby.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Phillip_Adams-Wright

Saturday, 6 March 2010

6 great trys from Tonderai Chavhanga

How to be a Rugby Union fan

Aside from wearing rugby shirts that resemble the union teams that they support, many rugby fans go out of their way to express themselves. However, sometimes fans do silly things that seem irrational or downright wacky, especially in the eyes of non-sport enthusiasts. Below are some of the things that rugby fanatics are willing to do just to show their undying loyalty and devotion for their much loved Rugby Union teams.

Seeing rugby shirts in the closet of a sports fan is nothing new. In fact, many people buy jersey reproductions of their favorite teams so they can wear it in a bar or on the field while watching a match. However, some fans go to the extent of filling their homes with paraphernalia and souvenir items of their Rugby Union team. Some even buy towels, bed sheets, pillowcases, clocks, posters, boxer shorts, pens, and even carpets adorned with their favorite Rugby Union team logo. There is really nothing wrong in finding that the room of an extreme rugby fan under the age of 18 is filled with memorabilia and other items of his favorite team. But for someone who is 40 years old and above, having a roomful of his favorite team's keepsakes (including blankets, bed sheets, and whoopee cushion) can be quite scary.

Sports fans, rugby fans included, really know how to enjoy themselves. Aside from painting their faces with the colors of their much loved teams, you will also see them wearing rugby shirts and waving flags. But sometimes, there are rugby fans who are willing to fight with other fans who support rival teams, especially after a match. Getting a tattoo in honor of your favorite rugby team is alright, but fighting with someone who is a supporter of a competing team can be considered a bit too much.

Many rugby fans celebrate after the victory of their favorite team. You can probably witness wild parties in every sports bar in your locality after a big rugby game. However, just recently, a fan of Wales Rugby team has done something outrageous to commemorate the victory of his beloved team. Well, he decided to mutilate himself as a show of support. Until now, that fan cannot really explain why he did something so outrageous. If you are a rugby fan, this is not something that you should follow. Instead, it might be better if you just stick to buying and wearing rugby shirts as a sign of support.

There's more information on rugby shirts at Rugby Union Shirt.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Thomas_Baugh

Friday, 5 March 2010

INSANE RUGBY FIGHTS!!!!

How to improve your core Rugby Skills

Rugby is a tough physical game and you need to prepare yourself both physically and mentally to make the most of what is a very rewarding game. There are some core rugby skills that every player, regardless of position, or level should work on.

General Fitness

Because of the shear physicality of rugby, it is hard to be effective at any level without at least a basic level of fitness. Surviving on the field for 80 minutes is hard slog if you haven't prepared yourself before the season. Good off season training should involve going for a run. You want to be running at least 5 km's by the time the season starts. Other general fitness exercises are useful as well, anything that gets the heart going...cycling, walking, swimming, rowing machine etc. It is good vary your fitness training to work different muscle groups and to keep yourself interested.

Ball Skills

Every position on the field requires you to have some core ball skills, some more so that others. It is hard to work on ball skills by yourself, however, there is always some skills you can work on regardless of how many mates you have to practice with. There is a good variety of grid drills which you can work on if you have others to work with. If you don't then you might need to get a bit creative. Kicking up and unders to yourself or practicing line out throws against a wall may make you feel silly, but you will benefit greatly for your efforts.

Strength

A strong physical player has an advantage in rugby. You need to work on your strength. Weight training is the best way to improve your strength. I won't go into exercises, however, players in different positions will benefit from different exercises.

Speed

Obviously this is more important for backs, and loose forwards, but players in any position will benefit from extra speed. You can work on this by doing sprint drills. I often hear comments like, I am a big fatty, and I'm never going to be any faster". However, if you look at the science of sprinting, players can develop muscle memory, and over time improve their speed if they work on it.

The more you put into your training, the more you will get out of your game. Off season is the best time to start. Get going.

Want some great free Rugby Drills and Resources? Then jump over to my site where you will find some great rugby coaching resources and a subscription option for a completely free newsletter delivered to your email regularly with great tips, drills and coaching resources. I have a site where I sell Rugby DVDs to improve your coaching skills.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Simon_B_Smith

Thursday, 4 March 2010

How to Play Rugby: Advanced

Rugby Pitch to the Sales Pitch

Steve Smith and Fran Cotton will be names evocative of a golden age of rugby to longstanding fans, having both captained England in the 1970's and 80's, both men have earned their places in the history books of the great game. During their fruitful partnerships with Sale, England and the British Lions, the pair experienced a great level of success on the field, but nobody could have predicted just how successful they were to be off the field.

Prior to 1995, rugby union was an amateur game, such that players would have to earn their living elsewhere. Smith and Cotton were particularly prolific in the employment side of their lives, with Cotton working as a regional sales manager, whilst Smith lectured on management and personnel. Following on from these business foundations and their bond on the pitch, the pair joined forces at Bukta Sportswear as their international careers drew to a close. Following a successful development of the company and sale to French Connection, Smith and Cotton decided to act on their entrepreneurial aspirations and set up their own company.

Cotton Traders was established in 1987 with the intention of becoming forerunners in the rugby and leisurewear market. Combining their knowledge of rugby, sales, management and marketing, cultivated over their years of juggling rugby and commerce: they were perfectly poised for success and lived up to that potential.

In 1989, after just 2 years of trading, the pair had managed to generate £2million turnover from their small office in Altrincham, Cheshire and then continued to expand operations at a phenomenal rate. Cotton Traders currently turns over more than £50million annually and boasts a workforce in excess of 700 people. The range of products offered by the company has expanded as rapidly as the company itself, with Cotton Traders covering everything from the original rugby shirts through to footwear, swimwear and accessories.

Much like in their earlier years of club and international rugby, both Smith and Cotton continue to juggle their 2 passions: rugby and business. With Smith still actively involved in the wholesale side of the company whilst also appearing as a television and radio commentator on international matches and Cotton consistently featuring on Boards and committees on the international side of English rugby when he isn't heading up the mail order arm of the business.

In an age when footballers command weekly wages in excess of many corporate directors' annual salary it is amazing to consider the success of these two men who have throughout their lives struck a balance between both sport and business at the very highest level.

Jamie Lyons

Writer for http://www.webvitality.co.uk.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jamie_R_Lyons